Documents of PWD that got lost in parliament recovered

Documents of PWD that got lost in parliament recovered
Director-General for Disability Affairs, Dr Stephen Dhieu

Documents for ratification of the UN Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) that got lost in Parliament have been recovered.

Dr. Stephen Dhieu, Director-General for Disability Affairs, told the City Review in an exclusive interview that it took a lot of effort to recover the documents from members of parliament in the Reconstituted Transitional National Legislative Assembly (R-TNLA).

Dhieu said a committee has been formed to fast-track the process of ratification of UNCRPD. He did not give a definite timeline for the committee to complete its work.

“The documents got lost during a sitting at R-TGoNU. So, I worked with the MPs, librarians and other specialized committees and we got the document,” Dhieu stated.

With the document now available, Dhieu said that they will fast track the process to ensure that South Sudan is incorporated in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (UNCRPD).

 “This working group would make the follow-up, and will push for the ratification not forgetting the national union of persons with disability. We are also working with them, empowering other organizations for persons with disabilities across the country, including the three administrative areas to see that they advocate for their own rights.”

In July 2022, the Undersecretary in the National Ministry of Gender, Child and Social Welfare, Esther Ikere, told the press that the document for ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability got lost in the parliament.
​She urged stakeholders to pour in their support to speed up the process of ratification of UNCRPD, adding that they would start the entire process afresh.

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities along with its Protocol A/RES/61/106, was adopted on December 13, 2006, in New York and signed on March 30, 2007.

The convention advocates for fair treatment of PWD by granting them equal rights and freedoms. When it is ratified, it will enable persons with disability to have access to assistive technology such as braille, and speech-language pathology, among others.

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